Tips for Keeping Your Pet Hydrated – Cheers to Hydration Month!

Water is Essential to Our Pets' Health It’s no secret that your pets need fresh clean drinking water every day for optimum health. It’s also no secret that cats and some dogs are very finicky about, well, pretty much everything! With the warmer weather approaching I want to talk about your pet’s drinking habits.

Water is an essential ingredient to life. All animals need it to help flush out toxins and to keep organs hydrated. Cats especially need to take in an adequate amount of water to prevent kidney problems, most notably kidney stones and kidney failure.

How Much Water
Does My Pet Need?

The amount of water that your pet needs to drink daily depends on his or her weight, activity level, and diet. Dogs are generally pretty good about regulating their water intake. As long as fresh, clean water is provided they will usually drink the amount their body requires. Keep in mind that with the warmer temperatures around the corner, your dog should also be drinking more to stay fully hydrated.

Cats get most of their water intake from their food. In the wild this is not much of an issue since raw meat contains up to 70% water. Dry food, on the other hand, only contains about 10% moisture. Some cats will supplement their food with extra drinking water and others are a little pickier.


Symptoms of
Dehydration in Pets:

    • Sunken Eyes
    • Lethargy
    • Loss of Appetite
    • Dry Mouth
    • Depression

Any sudden change in behavior can be cause for concern. Contact your vet if your pets’ drinking habits change suddenly; if they starting drinking an excessive amount of water, or stop drinking it altogether it could be a sign of a serious illness.

What if I Suspect
Dehydration?

      • Perform the skin test: Gently grab a fold of skin on the back of the neck or between the shoulder blades & release. If the skin snaps back into place, your pet should be okay. If the skin slowly returns to place, your pet could be dehydrated.
      • Have your pet checked by a vet.
      • Provide fresh, clean water daily.
      • Monitor your pet’s water intake, especially in the hot summer months.


Tips for Keeping
Your Pets Hydrated

If you are having trouble getting your pet interested in water there are a few things you can try.

        • Change the type of pet bowl. Some prefer ceramic (lead-free glazed, of course) over metal bowls and vice versa.
        • Try a pet fountain. Clean, fresh, running water might be more enticing for your pet, while others will appreciate the water being filtered (thus tastier) and kept cooler.
        • Change the location of their water dish. Be sure it is far from the litter box and/or out of direct sunlight.
        • Consider adding a wet food to your pet’s diet, or add water to their dry food. Wet cat foods usually contain around 80% water. Just be sure to adjust your portions of dry food to ensure you aren’t over feeding your pet.

Pet Hydration Infographic & Resources Referenced from PetSafe: http://www.petsafe.net/learn/pet-hydration-month

5 Simple Steps to Prevent Pet Obesity

4153580157_7000b383d1_mAccording to leading veterinarians, pet obesity is becoming an epidemic and should be a top health concern for pets. It is estimated that 54 million cats and 34 million dogs in the US are clinically obese. Many pet owners struggle with keeping their pets at an ideal weight.

We’ll admit, it can be sometimes hard to deny those puppy dog eyes and we just want our pets to be happy, right? So why can’t they have a few extra treats if they want them? Unfortunately, a few extra pounds can be detrimental.

The excess weight on our pets can cause a variety of other health problems, the same way obesity can have adverse effects on human health. A few extra pounds on a dog may not seem like anything to worry about, but the added weight can exacerbate arthritis, cause joint and bone issues, and it can greatly increase the possibility that your pet will develop diabetes or cardiac/respiratory disease. Thier immune systems can be diminished, making their ability to fight off other illnesses and disease.

It’s best to learn how to prevent pet obesity before weight related complications arise, because even if your pet loses weight, the damage may be irreversible.

Is My Pet Obese?

The easiest way to tell if your pet is overweight is to feel the ribs. If you can feel the individual rib bones easily your pet is most likely not overweight. The Healthy Weight Calculator from PetMD.com is also a great tool that can help you determine your pet’s proper healthy weight.

 

11273378_177099ccde_mCauses of Obesity

There isn’t just one cause of pet obesity; there are quite a few factors involved! Our pets rely on us to feed them properly and give them the proper amount of physical activity to stay fit. They don’t think about what they eat, if they are overeating and how it may effect their health. If your dogs are like mine, they will accept any treat or table scrap offered without hesitation.

Most pets, including cats, need a fair amount of physical activity each day in order for them to stay fit; a sedentary lifestyle combined with poor nutrition is the number one cause of pet obesity. When deciding what and how much to feed your pets, keep their activity level in mind. The amount of food listed in the instructions on pet food labels may contain too many calories for your pet, especially if they aren’t very active.

Many pet parents ‘free feed’ their animals, in other words, their animals have constant access to food throughout the day. Some pets, though few and far between, are good at self-regulating and stop eating when they are full, while others will scarf down food whenever it’s available. It’s important to measure out the amount of food that your pets eat in a day (including treats and table scraps!), so you can monitor their intake.

Some specific breeds may be more susceptible to obesity. These breeds may be predisposed to conditions including naturally slow metabolism and hormonal disorders that make them more likely to gain weight.

Having a pet spayed or neutered also causes metabolism to slow, and after the procedure many pets gain weight, but the benefits of spaying and neutering your pets far outweigh the negatives.

 

5 Simple Steps to Prevent Pet Obesity

1. Know Your Pets’ Caloric Requirements

The average human needs a 2000 calorie diet to maintain their weight and receive adequate nutrition, our pets need far less. Refer to the following chart to estimate the number of calories that your pets’ require. For a more accurate estimate of your dog’s require caloric intake, visit the Dog Food Advisor’s Dog Food Calculator.

2. Portion Control7362339338_b348e6b8ec_n

Use a smaller scoop and a smaller food bowl. Studies have shown that the size of your pet’s bowl and food scoop affects the amount of food that you feed your pet. If you have a Chihuahua and you are using an 8 inch bowl, you are probably going to overfeed Chico quite a bit. It all has to with how much food you perceive is in the bowl. If you used a small dish, you would perceive that you were feeding more food. If you are trying to help your pet lose weight, using a smaller bowl and a smaller scoop will go a long way towards helping them reach their goals.

3. Keep Track of Snacks

Many people are feeding the right amount of kibble for their dog’s appropriate weight, but they might also be feeding them a dozen milk bones or bites of “people food” throughout the day. Don’t forget that the treats and snacks that you feed your pet throughout the day should also count towards their daily calorie intake. That includes treats used for training! If you pet isn’t a picky eater, try using carrot sticks, apple slices or celery as a substitute for high calorie treats. They’re natural, whole foods and low in calories, and most pets love them.

4. Several Smaller Meals

If you feel that your pet seems hungry throughout the day, try dividing up your pet’s meals into smaller, more frequent meals throughout the day. Before you schedule your pet for 4 meals a day, a word of caution: your pet has probably trained you into feeding him when he does something specific. For example: Bear knows that if he sits next to the treat jar looking sad, I will probably hand him a cookie or if my cats meow at the top of their lungs for an hour, I’ll provide them with a scoop of kibble or two. My pets are likely not actually hungry, but they are repeating behaviors that in the past has been rewarded with a treat or extra meal. Try not to give in, redirect them with a game or go for a quick walk if they’re particularly relentless.

3835373704_1db968f4ff_m5. Veggies!

Supplementing meals with fresh or frozen vegetables or low calorie fruits can be a big help. The added fiber in the vegetables will help your pet feel fuller, longer. Don’t feed your pet foods that may be toxic, like tomatoes, onions, mushrooms, garlic, avocados, raw or green potatoes, grapes, raisins, or any pits, stems or seeds from fruits. I also tend avoid corn, since it is a common pet allergen.

You should always consult your veterinarian before putting your dog on a special diet or exercise program. The first, most important and often most difficult step is is to control the amount of food your pet is allowed to eat. If you cannot excercise your pet as often as necessary or if your dog has a condition that hinders activity and natural weight maintenance, your vet can often make recommendations to help with your situation.

A slow and steady approach is the healthiest, just as with people in the same predicament. Make slow changes to your pet’s diet and exercise regime. Your pet shouldn’t lose more than 1-2% of body weight per week.

Maintaining a healthy body weight and an active lifestyle will help you keep your pet at it’s happiest and healthiest for years to come!

8 Easy Steps to DIY Frozen Dog Treats

It’s the middle of July, and as we brace ourselves for the next heat wave, I’m thinking of ways to keep my pup cool, too. The evening news features footage of zookeepers serving frozen treats to captive animals – from frozen bananas and fruit juice to whole frozen fish and bloodcicles (awesome if you’re a tiger, I suppose) none of the animals deny a frozen treat for a few minutes of relief from these oppressive temperatures. So, what can we offer our pets at home?

  1. Start with a clean container that you can fit into your freezer. You can use anything from ice cube trays to plastic jugs, rubber toys (kongs work great) – muffin tins and popsicle forms also work great.
  2. Next formulate your mixture. It can be as simple as natural or low sodium chicken or beef broth, peanut butter & oatmeal, non-fat plain yogurt, lactose-free milk or cottage cheese.
  3. Fill the container of your choice.
  4. For and extra special treat add some kibble, training treats or even some cooked lean meat. Most dogs have a taste for fruits and veggies, too. Add sliced, chopped or pureed bananas, apples, pumpkin, sweet potato, carrot parsley or pineapple.
  5. Pop them into the freezer.
  6. Insert a bully stick or jerky strip when the treats are half frozen to make it a true pupsicle.
  7. Put back into the freezer until frozen.
  8. Serve to your pup! Frozen treats should be served outside to save you the melting mess inside.

If creativity and food prep isn’t your thing, we have options for you too.IMG_3739

  • Plain ice cubes or crushed ice can be a refreshing addition to the water bowl.
  • Frozen marrow bones.
  • Many companied, like Frosty Paws, are now creating doggie “ice cream” that’s ready to serve in portioned cups. You can often find these or similar products in many pet stores and even in some grocer’s freezers.

Next time you sip a shake or smoothie, be sure to have a frosty treat ready for your four pawed friend, too, you may be surprise how much they appreciate it!

 

Pet Friendly Destinations in Lancaster, PA

I want to take my dog everywhere! Let’s face it – he’s a part of the family. And the last thing I want to do is pay an expensive boarding company to keep my dog while I’m away. Why should I have all the fun? That’s why I put together this simple resource guide to help myself, and other pet owners, track down worthwhile places where the 4-legged family member can tag along too. As a bonus, I’ve added some personal thoughts on places around Lancaster County that I’ve found are GREAT for dogs!
 

Resources for finding pet friendly places

Bringfido.com is the ultimate resource to use when planning your vacation. They have anything, and everything you could possibly think of. From lodging to emergency pet care, it really has it all.
Dogfriendly.com has been around the longest, and is filled to the brim with awesome travel information. Feel like taking a pet friendly vacation abroad? Their database includes pet friendly travel destinations worldwide!
Petfriendlytravel.com not only shares tips for travel, but they include pet friendly vacation rentals by state. Yes, I would love a rental by t10010329_847073901986368_1949000252_ohe beach, Thank you!
Gopetfriendly.com has the best traveling tool called the Road Trip Planner. Just enter your departure and your destination, and check off the boxes that you are interested in. Like magic all of your pet friendly destinations are listed on your map. It’s awesome!
Petswelcome.com is the perfect site to use if you have a particular destination in mind. They list all of the top travel destinations, and you can even search by route. Stop at a pet friendly attraction on your way to your pet friendly destination.

If you are from Lancaster than you might already know of some of the pet friendly businesses that we have in the area. Visiting us for the first time? Don’t you worry your pretty little head, because I have your back.

 

Pet friendly places in Lancaster County

That Fish Place – That Pet Place

Pets of all walks of life are welcome in our 88,000 square foot store. You can shop until you drop, while your pet gets to socialize with other animals and our friendly staff.

Kitchen Kettle Village

Great place to bring the dog! They have places all over to put poop bags, and their entire place is accessible. Pick up some apple butter for yourself while you’re there, it’s the best!

Referenced from Kitchen Kettle's Facebook page.

Referenced from Kitchen Kettle’s Facebook page.

Amish House & Landis Valley Museum

The pups love the open air as much as I love the beautiful scenery. Dogs are allowed on the grounds of all of these two locations, but not in the individual buildings. I always travel in a small group so that no one gets left out.

Beau’s Dream Dog Park at Buchanan Park

park-header

Referenced from Beau’s Dream Dog Park’s Facebook page

The park features a large dog play area, as well as a small dog play area. The park is chock–full of splash gardens, obstacles, and a tree that launches tennis balls! The dogs all love this park, and it breaks their hearts when it’s time to leave.

Long’s Park

This park has been a Lancaster County staple since the 1900’s. It’s beautiful from its head down to its toes. During the summer the fun never stops with their free summer concert series. That’s right, I said free summer concerts. The pups love it!

Lancaster is not shy of any walking trails, thanks in part to the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. Enjoy the beautiful outdoors with your favorite furry friend, and be sure to check out some of the other local dog friendly parks along the way.

Referenced from Lancaster Brewing Company's Facebook Page.

Referenced from Lancaster Brewing Company’s Facebook Page.

I don’t know about you, but all of this exercise is making me hungry! Believe it or not, there are plenty of outdoor cafés and eateries throughout Lancaster. Four54 Grill, Prince Street Café, River Street Café, and Lancaster Brewing Company are just a few. If you have a bit of a sweet tooth, check out the newly renovated Splits & Giggles. With so many eateries that offer outdoor seating, there is no reason to dine without my pup.

After a long day of activities, we all need a good hard rest. Check into one of our local pet friendly hotels like Best Western Premier Eden Resort & Suites. Most of these hotels charge a small fee, but allow dogs of various sizes to stay. The best way to check on a specific hotel’s policy is to call and ask. The one I have listed here is not the only one. It’s still Always a great idea to call ahead first to determine their policies.

So what are you waiting for? Come to Lancaster and enjoy your stay.

July 4th Fun & Fireworks – Pet Anxiety & Safety Tips

The July 4th Holiday is upon us, and unfortunately it is one of the busiest times for animal shelters due to the overwhelming amount of dogs lost during the fireworks & festivities. The fireworks may be fun for us, for some of our canine friends it can be downright terrifying.

During fireworks displays, or even while setting off fireworks in your backyard and neighborhood, your usually calm family pet may become extremely stressed. The stress overload can cause some pets to try to escape the house or yard. By following a few simple tips for this holiday weekend you can avoid coming home to an empty house and the anxiety of a missing beloved family pet.

SAFEjuly4

  • Avoid bringing your pet to fireworks displays, even if they are not usually startled by loud noises or thunder.
  • Keep your pet indoors in a quiet, safe, sheltered area. Keep doors and windows closed and locked (I’ve heard stories of dogs opening slider doors or even jumping through windows to escape). Leave the TV on or play soothing music at a normal level to distract him from the noise outside
  • Prepare a safe “den” for your pet. If they choose to hide under the bed, in their crate or somewhere else in the house, allow them to. If your dog is not crate trained, and you would like him to be please visit our comprehensive crate training guide.
  • Feed your pet before the displays begin and keep a special chew treat on hand as a distraction.
  • Nervous or stressed dogs may chew to ease anxiety. Make sure to provide proper chew toys and make sure all cords and other dangerous objects are out of reach
  • Try a calming aid to help calm anxiety, or ask your vet for medication to help with your pet’s noise phobia.
  • Do not leave your pet outside during the festivities. Even with a fence or a tie-out a dog can go to great lengths to escape the source of their anxiety.
  • Always make sure your pet is wearing a properly fitted dog collar with up-to-date ID tags. Consider having your pet microchipped for extra security.
  • Try not to reward anxiety with extra attention. It may be hard not to cuddle or fawn over your pet when he is scared, but do your best to ignore axious behavior or practice distraction techniques to turn their focus away from commotions.

Follow these simple steps to enjoy a worry free Independence Day. The knowledge that your family pets are safe and sound will make your holiday all the more fun. Have a great holiday weekend!

Severe Weather can also be very stressful on our pets. Check out this post for tips on keeping you pets calm during severe weather.

Pet Boarding Facilities in the Lancaster, PA Area

Looking for a boarding facility in the Lancaster, PA area? We’ve put together a resource of some local options to make your search easier. Please be sure to research if pet boarding is the right solution for you and to tour any facility you are considering boarding your pets in. Please note, That Fish Place – That Pet Place is not affiliated with or endorsing any of these facilities and is not compensated for their inclusion.

 

Canine Country Club, Inc.

888 N. Penryn Road
Manheim, Pennsylvania 17545
(717) 665-2710
www.caninecountryclubinc.com

“Canine Country Club, Inc. is a family owned and operated pet rooming, daycare, and grooming / spa facility located in beautiful Manheim, Pennsylvania. With humble beginning and a string faith, the business had grown to become the area’s finest pet vacation resort. Founders and co-owners Gary & Kim Buchen live on-location in their restored 1800s farm house.”

  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Daycare
  • Grooming

Prices start at $26 per night for dogs and $20 per night for cats
*2 night Minimum

 

Country Club Pet Lodge

440 Stoney Ln.
Lancaster PA 17603
(717) 872-5471
countryclubpetlodge.com

“Here at Country Club Pet Lodge your pet will feel right at home. We have spacious indoor and outdoor spaces for your pet to roam. We also offer additional playtime in our yard as well as walks for your pets. (Walks and free play are extra) Your pet will be greatly taken care of by our friendly staff. Our first priority is that your pet has the best experience possible.”

  • Dog Boarding
  • Grooming
  • Training

Prices start at $19 per day for dogs

 

Country Pet Hideaway

748 Vinemont Rd.
Reinholds, PA 17569
(610) 775-2876
RamminRetrievers@comcast.net
www.countrypethideaway.com

“Welcome to Country Pet Hideaway, we are a full service boarding and grooming kennel located in Reinholds, Pa. We offer a clean and relaxing atmosphere on our 16 acre property. Our kennels are equipped with ADT for smoke detection and temperature monitoring. We also installed a computer controlled automatic generator back up system in case of power outages. All of our buildings have heat and air conditioning which keeps your pets healthy and happy. Radio is played 24 hours a day for both cats and dogs.”

  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Grooming
  • Heated pool
  • Training

Prices start at $25 per day for dogs and $14 per day for cats

 

Harbor Woods Boarding Kennel

109 Oak Road
Conestoga, PA 17516
717-872-0674
harborwoodssteve@gmail.com
harborwoodskennel.com

“While you’re on vacation, your dog will receive the careful, thoughtful attention at a reasonable price naturally provided by a modest-sized, single-owner boarding kennel. Your dog will be housed in one of our 30 spacious runs and will have two individual walks each day at no extra charge.”

  • Dog Boarding

Prices start at $20 per day for dogs
Cash or check only.

 

Kieffer’s Kennel Boarding & Grooming

520 W 28th Division Hwy
Lititz, PA 17543
717-626-6961
www.kiefferskennel.com

“At Kieffer’s Kennel Boarding and Grooming, it is our mission to be committed to provide the uppermost excellences in canine services available.
We know that boarding your much-loved family member can be a traumatic proposition – for both you and your dog. You can rest assured that we take seriously the accountability of providing a harmless and loving environment for your pet.”

  • Dog Boarding
  • Grooming

Price start at $18.50 per night for dogs

 

Locust Run Kennels

1120 Canadochly Rd
York, PA 17406-8683
717-252-4597
locustruncustomerservice@comcast.net
locustrunkennels.com

“Our climate-controlled cattery and indoor kennels ensures that your pet will be safe and happy regardless of the weather! You don’t ever have to worry about your pet being left outside in the sweltering heat or the bitter cold.
At Locust Run Kennels, our professionals understand that not all pets require the same care. We are able to administer medicine dosages, both orally and by injection, to your senior or special needs pet.”

  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Grooming

Prices start at $15.25 per day for dogs and $11.50 per day for cats

 

Neffsville Veterinary Clinic

2555 Lititz Pike
Lancaster, PA 17601
(717) 569-5381
info@neffsvillevet.com
www.neffsvillevet.com

“Neffsville Veterinary Clinic is so much more than just a medical facility for your pet.  Aside from our comprehensive medical service offerings, NVC is proud to be your trusted resource for everything relating to your pet.  From food to lodging and right on to grooming and shopping, NVC is your one- stop for all our pet care needs.”

  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Small Pet & Reptile Boarding
  • Grooming
  • Day Care
  • Nutrition
  • Training
  • Veterinary
  • Boutique

Prices start at $25 per night for dogs and $20 per night for cats. Small pet & reptile boarding available upon request

 

Oscar’s Pet Resort

521 Willow Road
Lancaster, PA 17601
(717) 397-0726
info@oscarspetresort.com
www.oscarspetresort.com

“Oscar’s Pet Resort is an all-inclusive pet resort in Lancaster County, PA, providing luxurious overnight accommodations, doggie daycare programs, state-of-the-art grooming from certified dog groomers and a variety of training programs and workshops to suit your pet’s needs.”

  • Training
  • Grooming
  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Daycare
  • Sports & Rec

Prices start at $44 per night for dogs $24 per night for cats

 

Don’t see your favorite Lancaster, PA- area boarding facility on the list? Please let us know in the comments and we’ll add it. Have a great Summer!

 

 

How To Tell If Kittens Are Abandoned

Hello, my name is Tricia K. I currently own 3 cats, Bubba is 5, Firefly (aka Bug) is 3, and Scrappy is 7/8 months old. I have been volunteering for a rescue called “Lost Paws of Lancaster” for about 3 years, fostering for about 2 years. I have worked at That Fish Place – That Pet Place for almost 2 years as a cashier. I enjoy learning new things about all animals and applying what I learn to help others.image

When you volunteer for a cat rescue, the season of spring is more commonly known as “Kitten Season”. This is the time of year that we begin getting phone calls asking us to take in pregnant or nursing moms and their litters of kittens. The more common call, however, is for “abandoned kittens.” I put quotes around it because more often than not the kittens aren’t really abandoned.

Unlike human children, who are rarely without a parent in sight, kittens can be left alone for hours at a time and the mom usually isn’t far off. In fact, mom may even be watching you. People often don’t realize this and tend to automatically assume that mom has left the litter to starve. They then decide to take things into their own hands and “help” which isn’t always in the best interest of the kittens.

 

How To Tell If Kittens Are Abandoned & Need Your Help

  • Unless the kittens are in immediate danger, don’t move them. Mom may just be out getting some dinner, or taking a break. (You’d need to take a breather too if you had so many babies at once!). If you have to move them, make sure it is nearby where mom can see or hear them calling for her.
  • Keep an eye on the nest from a distance for 12 to 18 hours to determine if they’re truly abandoned. Depending on how old the kittens are, moms can stay away for hours at a time. It can be hard to tell if mom slips in and out when you aren’t looking. A way to help tell if the mom has returned is to sprinkle flour around the area. If mom comes back she will leave paw prints in the powder.
  • Don’t be alarmed if some of the kittens go missing. This is probably a good sign. Active Moms will move their kittens from place to place if they feel they are in danger.
  • If hours pass and the babies are dirty, fussy and loud, it is safe to consider them abandoned. It’s important to remember to wait an appropriate amount of time and to stay calm. A lot of people panic and want to scoop the kittens up and care for them right away. However, caring for kittens, especially young ones that don’t eat solid food, is a lot of work that most people aren’t prepared to take on. It is also more dangerous for kittens growing up without a mom and the comfort and milk she provides. Whenever possible, keep mom in the picture.

What if Mom Doesn’t Return? What now?20150502_220009

  • If you have truly abandoned kittens, and you are not prepared to take on the responsibilities of motherhood, feel free to call your local rescues. Please keep in mind that kitten season is a very busy time of year. Rescues exhaust their resources very quickly and you may be declined. Fosters for bottle babies (kittens without mommas that cannot eat solid food yet) are always in short supply because they are a lot of work.
  • If you are able to foster the litter the rescues may have a waiting list that you can be put on to help your kittens and lighten your load.

Even if the rescues can’t take in your litter they may have tips and tricks to make your go at being a momma cat much easier.

This Kitten season, Please be patient and do what you can to help appropriately. While it’s hard to resist a pile of adorable, cuddly kittens, letting Mom handle their care is sometimes the best option.

 

Canine Flu Outbreak 2015 – What to Know

Given the recent reports of the canine flu outbreak in the Chicago area, we wanted to put together a few simple tips for helping to prevent or detect if your dog has the virus.

Q: Where have cases been found so far?

A: There have been over 1,000 cases reported in the Chicago area and a few surrounding states. As of this writing, none have been reported in Pennsylvania

Q: How can I tell if my dog, or if other dogs, have the Dog Flu?

A: The best thing to look for, as with many diseases, is a change in regular behavior. The most common early signs are a hacking cough. Green discharge from the nose or eyes is another symptom. Untreated, these can develop into significant fevers or pneumonia. If you notice any of this, please consult a veterinarian

Q: How can I Help Stop My Dog From Getting Sick?

A: The virus is very contagious. The best thing to do is to avoid potentially exposing your dog to a dog who might be sick.

Q: Can people catch the disease?

A: No, people can not contract the disease from their dogs. They can, however, help spread it through contact with surfaces. For example, the virus can live on surfaces for 24-48 hours. If you pet a dog and then touch a counter top, it is possible to spread the contamination. Washing your hands and sanitizing is always a good idea in these cases.

Q: Has this happened before or is this unusual?

A: Dog Flu outbreaks occur relatively frequently. The fear with this one is that it’s a new strain that dog flu vaccinations may not prevent.
If you have any questions about the Dog Flu – please consult a veterinarian.

If you’d like to read more – please see this article – http://www.petage.com/canine-flu-outbreak-caused-by-new-strain/

Lessons Learned Moving Cross-County with Dogs

Hi Pet Blog Readers, It’s been a long hiatus since my last post but for a good reason. My husband and I sold everything and followed our hearts and dreams to Alaska, The Last Frontier. I know it sounds crazy, it felt crazy! It was an incredible journey to get to my new home in the 49th state, and that’s what I’m here to tell you about.

Moving Cross Country3 dogs, 2 adults, 1 Subaru and enough belongings to get by for 2 months; we could have been a very entertaining Subaru commercial, had there been any room for camera equipment!

The 4,579 miles from our lifelong home in Lancaster, Pennsylvania to Chugiak, Alaska would take just over 6 days to complete, with no time for sightseeing. That kind of a journey doesn’t just happen on a whim; it took months of careful planning and preparation to ensure our safe journey across North America. I’d like to share some of the lessons I learned driving cross-country with my dogs.

 

 

Keep Pets Safe in the Car

Safety is the number one concern for driving cross-country. Our dogs are notoriously rambunctious in the car and we feared having to battle to keep them in the backseat while driving on a busy highway. I researched backseat barriers and travel harnesses at length.

The harnesses didn’t appear to be a good option for us because we would have three dogs in the backseat for days at a time. We didn’t want to limit any of their sleeping options; like the floor of the backseat. We didn’t know if they would tangle themselves while racing from window to window, and we didn’t have time to experiment. So, instead, we opted to install a backseat barrier. Being cost-cautious and of the mindset that any visual barrier would deter our dogs, I chose a mesh one with buckle fasteners.

We did test drives using the barrier with success in our home town. However, once we boarded the car with our luggage, everything changed and the dogs became more aware of every weakness in our system.

Lesson Learned: Do Your Research

If I had it to do over again, I’d gladly shell out the extra cash for a solid barrier properly installed in the car. Within the first 5 minutes, Gatsby and figured out how to maneuver into the front seat, the other two not far behind. We had to sacrifice some shoelaces to shore up the weak points.

Proper Hydration and Nutrition for Travelling Pets

Gatsby in the Front
We found a large cup that fit snuggly into the backseat cup holders. Every time we stopped we filled up the cups in the back and the dogs could drink whenever they needed to during the ride. It was messy, but effective.

If you can, leave enough space in your luggage for 1 gallon per 3 days of water using the water that your dogs drink at home. I should have taken 9 gallons of water, but I only stashed 3. I assumed I would refill at hotels and stops along the road.

 

Dogs WatersideThe reason for storing their regular drinking water is to avoid the very slight chance that the dogs would get sick; caused by the different chemistries of water from state to state. We were also traveling through remote areas of Canada and I didn’t know anything about the water quality in that region.

 

I wish I had taken more water not because of the water quality but because I forgot to refill our gallons more than once. This oversight caused us to need to purchase spring water from the next gas station; an unnecessary expense in added to an already expensive trip.

 

Lesson Learned: Pack more foodShowing the effects of a long trip

We packed enough dog food for our trip, plus one extra week. We had one week of food left when we got to Alaska, and the two local pet stores don’t sell our brand! Gasp!

Traditionally, to avoid gastrointestinal distress, you should slowly wean your pets off their old food and on to a new food over a period of 1 to 2 weeks. I didn’t have that kind of time.

We used the three or four days we had to wean them faster than usual. Luckily, we averted dietary-disaster and the dogs transitioned to a new food without much more than some extra gas. I would’ve appreciated more time to properly research my options and transition to a new dog food.

 

 

Crowded seatPack Light

Bring some of the comforts of home. The keyword there is ‘some’. The small collection of toys and dog chews quickly became overkill and a burden in our heavily laden car. Maybe pare it down to one favorite toy or chew per dog plus a thin blanket.

Leashes & Identification On At All Times

Lesson Learned: At all times means at all times

I let my guard down. I was tired after long days of riding in a car. I checked us into the hotel, entered the room, removed the dogs’ leashes and got ready for bed. I forgot, however, that my husband would be bringing some of the luggage into the room in a few moments.

ArrivedThe card reader beeped and the door opened. In a blur, all three dogs were racing down the hall into the lobby and towards the front door before we had time to react!  One of my dogs is skittish and the first slight noise sent her scurrying back to me where I held onto her collar. My husband ran after the two excited escapees and was able to herd them back into the hallway where I could lure them back into the room with desperate offerings of treats and food.

I don’t like to think about losing my dogs, but I’m prepared. Microchips are great and I have heard a lot of wonderful stories about microchip reunions, but the remote areas I was traveling through wouldn’t have regular access to microchip readers, or even internet access. I relied on a backup of up-to-date ID tags. I had just my dog’s name and our cell phone numbers

Worlds Largest Truckstop SignTime Zones May Change, But A Dog’s Internal Clock Doesn’t

We travelled across 4 time zones, but our dogs were still hungry at noon instead of 4:00pm. Prepare for some transition time.

Never Travel Alone

I had the misfortune of coming down with mild food poisoning during our trek through Canada. I would have been in trouble if I were traveling alone. Thankfully my husband did not suffer this fate and was there to help with the dogs and all the added stress that they bring to a cross- country car trip.

 

Road into mountains

So Many Lessons, Not Enough Time

I could probably continue to write about this for days and still have advice left to give. All in all, we were very well prepared and made it safely without any major incidents. The lessons we learned were infinite, and I’m sure yours will be too. I can sum it up with one statement: It was an adventure that I wouldn’t be quick to repeat; but one I wouldn’t trade for the world.

I’m really interested to hear if any of you have your own tales of the road with your furkids and any lessons you’d like to pass on to fellow travelers? Reply below. Safe travels, everyone!

6 FREE Local Places to promote your Pet Rescue Events Online

Here at That Fish Place – That Pet Place – we always try to assist local rescues and pet organizations whenever we can.  I have personally been on the forefront of this for the last few months in my position as the Local Community and Events Coordinator.  There are a lot of rescues in and around Lancaster County.  As a pet lover, chances are you are either involved with a rescue or you may know someone who is.

Promoting a rescue or other non-profits can be expensive – but it doesn’t have to be.  There are many national event posting sites, as well as local Lancaster, Pennsylvania sites.  Not from Lancaster Pennsylvania? Do a quick Google search using the keywords “Event posting sites” and your current location.  It’s that easy!  Below are 6 FREE ways that I have found to promote your rescues events online.

Yelp.com (National)

 download     

  • In order to promote an event on Yelp, you must first sign up as a business. Signing up for Yelp is absolutely free.  Once you are signed up, you can add an event by simply clicking on the events tab and inputting the information.  The advantage to using this site is that you can search for an event by category and locale.  The other added bonus is that you can get feedback regarding your event if an attendee submits a review.  This can help you plan future events.

 

Eventful.com (National)

eventful

  • Eventful is another site that is 100% free.  You can create an account, or log in with your existing Facebook.  Once you have added your event, you can add imagery.  The added bonus by using Eventful is that each event can be tagged to up to three categories.  The more categories selected, the more your event will populate when people search the website.

Eventbrite.com (National)

eventbrite

  • Event Brite is a great site to use if you like to keep track of how many people plan to attend your event.  There is no charge for selling free tickets on Event Brite.  Simply create an account, and add your event.  You can use Event Brite for paid admission as well, with the option of deducting the transaction fee from each ticket or adding the fee to each ticket.  The event is still free to post, and any transaction fee will get applied before deposit to your PayPal account.  Attendees can use any major credit card.  Event Brite would be a huge benefit to your large scale event.

Pennlive.com (Central PA)

pennlive

  • Pennlive is an online distribution of the Patriot News, which is directed to Central Pa. Adding an event is simple and you do not have to create an account to do so. You can also link a previously posted event from another site (like Facebook) by adding the additional URL to your event submission.

360lancaster.com (Lancaster PA)

360lancaster

  • 360lancaster is another great event source. The process of entering the event is simple with your audience retaining to Lancaster County.  Would you like to expand your audience?  Check out 360York.  The added bonus to this page, there is a Lancaster Nonprofit organization category.  Thus making your event highlighted in one easy click.

Susquehannalife.com (Central PA)

sus

  • Susquehanna Life makes it really easy to submit an event.  Simply create an account or log in with one of four existing social accounts (Facebook, Google, Yahoo, or Windows live).  The reach for your event is throughout Central Pa and Susquehanna.  Event postings are free, and their customer service is amazing.

With all of these sources at your fingertips, why not take advantage?  Our generations X ways are the things of yesterday.  It is time to move it on up to the digital era.  Personally, I could do without all of the paper cuts.

If you would like to know more about posting your event on any of these sites or if you have any questions about promoting your rescue please feel free to contact me at tries@thatpetplace.com.  Thank you!

 

Scroll To Top